Engaging with Thanks….

 

On my desk 2

Hello Lovely Readers,

As the holidays grow closer it can be harder to stay engaged and remember to be the Beauty you are and Love. To this end I offer a photo of the rose on my writing desk (fresh from the front garden), and this beautiful definition of Love by one of my favorite teachers, Thich Nhat Hanh, for your Thanks-Giving holiday…Oh and some bonus eye-candy to soothe those overstretched and stimulated senses at the bottom of the page.

My dear friend, Gyana, whose husband of 7 years asked her to frame it and put near their bedside sent it to me! Ahhh.. now that is beautiful and so are you..xoxox Engagingly Yours, Sabrina

For us to remember……..According to Buddhism, there are four elements of true love. 

The first is  maitri, which can be translated as loving-kindness or benevolence. Loving-kindness is not only the desire to make someone happy, to bring joy to a beloved person; it is the  ability to bring joy and happiness to the person you love, because even if your intention is to love this person, your love might make him or her suffer. Training is needed in order to love properly; and to be able to give happiness and joy, you must practice  deep looking directed toward the person you love. Because if you do not understand this person, you cannot love properly.
The second element of true love is compassion,  karuna. This is not only the desire to ease the pain of another person, but the  ability to do so. You must practice deep looking in order to gain a good understanding of the nature of the suffering of this person, in order to be able to help him or her to change. Knowledge and understanding are always at the root of the practice. The practice of understanding is the practice of meditation. To meditate is to look deeply into the heart of things. 

The third element of true love is joy, mudita. If there is no joy in love, it is not true love. If you are suffering all the time, if you cry all the time, and if you make the person you love cry, this is not really love ―it is even the opposite. If there is no joy in your love, you can be sure that it is not true love. 
“What must we do in order to understand a person? We must have time; we must practice looking deeply into this person. We must be there, attentive; we must observe, we must look deeply. And the fruit of this looking deeply is called understanding. Love is a true thing if it is made up of a substance called understanding.” 
The fourth element is  upeksha, equanimity or freedom. In true love, you attain freedom. When you love, you bring freedom to the person you love. If the opposite is true, it is not true love. You must love in such a way that the person you love feels free, not only outside but also inside. “Dear one, do you have enough space in your heart and all around you?” This is an intelligent question for testing out whether your love is something real. 

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Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh is a global spiritual leader, poet and peace activist, revered throughout the world for his powerful teachings and bestselling writings on mindfulness and peace.

His key teaching is that, through mindfulness, we can learn to live happily in the present moment—the only way to truly develop peace, both in one’s self and in the world.

Thich Nhat Hanh has published over 100 titles on meditation, mindfulness and Engaged Buddhism, as well as poems, children’s stories, and commentaries on ancient Buddhist texts. He has sold over three million books in America alone, some of the best-known include Peace Is Every StepThe Miracle of MindfulnessThe Art of PowerTrue Love and Anger.

About engagingly yours

Passionate Poet, Writer, Yoga Teacher, Realistic Idealist, Devotee, servant and Champion of Beauty, Lover of Life: visit me at Engagingthesenses.com
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